How Are Your Resolutions Working?

Have you given up on your resolutions yet? Many of us have. And why is that? Well, Louie and I learned the hard way and we may have the answer you’re looking for.

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Contact us to have us speak at your event. Louie is available to attend as well.

Holiday Relationship Help!

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We love the holidays with all the celebrations between Thanksgiving and New Years! But have you noticed that one little relationship that just gets on your nerves? Why? Could it be…well, I won’t ruin the fun. I’ll let Louie share a little tip on how to improve relationships!
READ MORE…
We hope you have a very blessed Hanukkah and a Merry Christmas!

Does Your Team Have The Same Goals As You?

I’ve noticed lately I no longer enjoy my walks with my rescue pup, Louie. It saddens me to share that publicly, but it is the truth—a truth I had to take time to explore and understand.

I love to walk because I enjoy the outdoors and because it’s an excellent way for me to exercise. I also enjoy seeing my neighbors and getting a chance to catch up with them.

But apparently, Louie takes walks for a different reason.

Click the link below to read more…

 

Does Your Team Have the Same Goals as You?

Love Like Louie Book Clubs…
Has your child and their friends read Love Like Louie, or are a group of you interested in reading the book together?

Louie and I would LOVE to speak to your little book club about the book and the lessons learned 🐶

For more information on how to schedule a session with Louie and Danise, email us at danise@di-advisors.com #lovelikelouie #kidsbookclub

Missed our previous blogs? Check out our leadership blogs here:

 

How Could One Word Be So Disruptive?

“I hope you have a good lawyer,” said the CEO as he leaned back in his chair. He meant no malice by that comment. He was just confused about the use of this one little word.

Read more about this four-legged, I mean letter, word!

 

 

As always, Louie sends his pawsome love!

    

 

Did you know the book, Love Like Louie, has a discussion guide to help middle-school children form book clubs and talk about how they’re being treated and how they treat others? The questions are easy to answer and allow children to not only share their feelings but the guide provides action steps to make a change in their behavior!

Love Like Louie is endorsed by Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The New One Minute Manager® and Servant Leadership in Action:  

“I love this book because it’s all about the power of love–the love between a little girl and a skinny stray dog named Louie. Love Like Louie is a wonderful book with lessons for kids, for adults, for everybody who believes that love really can conquer all.”

Click here to order a copy (or two) for your middle-grade child…they’ll love the story!

 

Contact us:

Info@louiveloves.me

 

 

Look Beyond Failure and Rejection

 

Well, we certainly had an interesting adventure. Louie failed miserably during a hospital visitation assessment. As we drove home, I observed him in the back seat of the car. Looking at that little face, I had to ask myself…which one of us truly failed?

Read More…

 

 

 

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Stop bullying 🚫 Start talking 🗣

Did you know the book, Love Like Louie, has a discussion guide to help middle-school children form book clubs and talk about how they’re being treated and how they treat others? The questions are easy to answer and allow children to not only share their feelings but the guide provides action steps to make a change in their behavior!

Love Like Louie is endorsed by Ken Blanchard, coauthor of The New One Minute Manager® and Servant Leadership in Action:  

“I love this book because it’s all about the power of love–the love between a little girl and a skinny stray dog named Louie. Love Like Louie is a wonderful book with lessons for kids, for adults, for everybody who believes that love really can conquer all.”                          

Click here to order a copy (or two) for your middle-grade child…they’ll love the story!

We’re Back With Something New!

New Year, New Lou!

We hope this year is off to a great start. We’re excited to share our 2019 news with you.

First, we’ve changed the name of our blog to Lead Like Louie, which coincides with our books, Love Like Louie and soon-to-be released, Lead Like Louie.

Also, we’re pleased to announce that Louie has gone big-time. Not to worry-he’s still the same lovable pup with lots of “character.” But we’ve joined forces with The LeadChange Group. Lead Change is a leadership media destination with a unique editorial focus on driving change within organizations, teams, and individuals.

This month, Lead Like Louie discusses how leaders send mixed signals (of course that never happens here). Click here to read our new blog.

Let us know what you think. And stay tuned for more exciting news about our new soon-to-be released book, Lead Like Louie!

As always, Louie sends his love!

 

 

COMING SOON…

A Very Special Goodbye

I knew this day would come. I had been dreading it for some time, yet I knew it was near. Louie’s sweet little friend, Ellie, recently passed. Those who loved her, especially her mom, Lynne Ruhl, are devastated.

I met Ellie some time ago when she was just a pup while visiting with Lynne at her home. Ellie needed to be in my lap, next to me, by my feet, sitting right next to my chair—anywhere in close proximity. I wanted to believe I was special but as I grew to know Ellie, I realized she treated everyone pretty much the same. She just loved humans.

When my dear friend Lynne moved into my neighborhood, I was thrilled. Not only to have a close friend nearby, but also because of Ellie. I was able to spend more time with Ellie, walking her, having her visit with us. Louie loved her and often sought her advice, very much like I do with Lynne. [Blog Post; Addressing Conflict; with Ellie Ruhl]

When her little face would pop up in the door window, I knew Lynne wasn’t home. That gave me an opportunity to steal my little Ellie away and spend time with her doing our favorite pastime—walking. She was such a joy to walk. She pranced, like the princess she was. But the funniest part of walking her was when she would see a human. She was convinced that the person needed to see her, and she pranced right over to them. The person would light up when they saw Ellie, whether or not they were a dog person.

When she saw a dog, she would react the same way, convinced the dog was very much interested in making her acquaintance. When the dog showed signs of not wanting her near, she was shocked and unconvinced. I had to laugh at her desire to know everyone. She knew if she loved all created beings, then all created beings would love her.

Oh, my sweet Ellie, if only that were true. If only our world loved as easily as you did.

Ellie broke her foot shortly after moving into their condo. She was running in the backyard and her foot caught in a grate. I thought she would lose her prance, but she seemed to spring right back. There were many long walks and fun times with that precious girl.

And then over the last year or so, I noticed her decline. She slowly stopped jumping high in the air when she saw people, her pranced slowed — a little at first, and then a lot– and her long hesitation before hopping onto a step was noticeable. My heart was sad, and I looked for any sign of the precious little Ellie that I knew and loved. I usually witnessed an ever so slight indication, which thoroughly convinced me she was fine.

That was until I took her outside for the very last time. In fact, I knew it would be the last time I’d see her. I helped her up the step into the house. As she oriented herself, I knelt beside her. Not wanting to upset her with my display of emotion, I quietly whispered, “Ellie, you are loved. Thank you for loving me and Louie and everyone you came in contact with.” That was all I could get out. The sadness was overwhelming.

I saw Lynne when she arrived home from Ellie’s last visit with the vet. My heart broke for her because I know that pain all too well. Losing our pets is very difficult. Losing Ellie was heartbreaking for Lynne.

Honestly, I doubt I will ever meet another created being who could make someone—anyone—feel as loved as Ellie did. She exuded love and never cared who you were, what you did, or how you looked. If you were breathing, she loved you. Imagine our world if we treated others as Ellie did. And as much as I know many people love Louie, I’m being truthful when I say he is a bit more reserved about showing love to others.

To our little Ellie; thank you for bringing such love into our world. You are sorely missed, little one. And you will always be loved.

“You, LORD, preserve both people and animals.” Ps: 36:6

 

 

NOTE: Louie and I will resume our blog in September. We are feverishly working on our newest project, Love Like Louie.

Walk with Confidence

I’ve noticed something a bit different lately about Louie, my rescue pup. He really enjoys it when we walk side by side during our walks. What’s different about that, you might ask?

He’s always enjoyed our time together and is usually all over the place when we walk. To get him to walk right next to me (as we’ve been taught during dog training), I usually have to make him heel. What’s different now is that he heels without me giving the command. Now he walks right next to me, many times for the entire walk, enjoying every step. It’s like we’re BFFs just hanging out. Well, maybe we are, but this change in our walks together gives me paws to think about leadership.

Louie walks next to me with confidence and joy because I, his leader, am walking with confidence and joy. This time last year I was still recuperating from a terrible accident. And, needless to say, this winter, though I was out walking, I walked with extreme caution. Now that the weather is turning warmer, there’s a bit more spring in my step and I am back to walking confidently and fast. And Louie is reaping the benefits.

When I say, “Leader, you must walk with confidence,” it may conjure up a lot of different thoughts and feelings about leadership. Many leaders walk with confidence because of pride issues, others put on airs and act like they’re confident. I believe the leaders who truly are confident provide a safe place for employees to flourish. Those leaders are confident not in their own abilities but in the abilities and strengths of those they lead. They can walk with confidence because they have a team around them they believe in, one they have encouraged and affirmed, and they work well together.

Walking with confidence is not about you, it is about those you lead, those you’ve empowered to be who they were created to be. It’s not about you puffing yourself up, it’s about those who choose to follow you and the confidence they have in you to be an excellent leader. Take the challenge and walk with confidence, but be sure it is because of the outward focus you have on the strengths and skills of others on your team.

As for Louie, well, I’m pretty sure if he were writing this it would be all about his confidence and how he walks next to me to make sure I am protected. Way to go, Louie! Such a good boy!

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Louie had to say goodbye to his cousin, Perry, a couple of weeks ago. We’re so glad we had time to cuddle that sweet boy the week before. Mark, Agnes, Bernadette and Christian and all the DiStasi kids will miss him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT: danise@di-advisors.com

 

The Cone of Shame and the Need to Adapt

In the last Louie’s Leadership blog, I shared the episode of Louie, my adopted pup, having surgery to remove a growth on his paw. It was a pretty quick decision, with some uncertainty about what the growth was and how he would handle the recuperation period.

He survived the surgery well, and the growth was a papilloma, a wart. The biggest issue we had was keeping him away from the stitches. Louie is like Houdini; he can get out of any bandage or covering that I put on him to prevent him from chewing on his paw. I was amazed at how many times I found his bandage on the floor somewhere.

LIFE’S ADJUSTMENTS

We came home with a very nice, pliable, see-through cone that was to be placed over his head to keep him from chewing his stitches. I was hesitant to use it because of the look he gave me when I tried to put it on him. First, it was a look of defiance (gee, I’ve never seen that one before), and then he’d look as though I was trying to kill him. And finally, I’d get the puppy dog big brown eyes that captured my heart the very first time I met him.

I attached his collar and slid the cone over his head, stating in a serious, parental tone, “This is for your own good, buddy.” He hated it! And he was mad at me. He decided the best thing he could do was trot out of the room and go to his happy place to look out the window and be away from me. Except he ran into the doorframe and stopped. He looked back at me with a look of “Are you kidding me?” Then he set himself back on track, maneuvered the cone to clear the doorframe, and walked out of the room.

Next, he hit the doorframe going into the room with a view. Again, he stopped, looked back at me, and shook his head. Again, he set himself back on track and maneuvered the cone so he could walk into the room, clearing the doorframe. I could hear him trying to jump up on the seat to look out the window, but because the cone got in the way, he fell back down. He tried again, missed again, and fell back down.

I resisted the urge to jump in and help. I knew he could do it; he just needed to adjust himself a bit to clear the seat. And so he did, finally, and then positioned himself as close to the window as possible so that everyone could see him and would feel sorry for him. And they did.

LESSONS LEARNED

I learned a few valuable leadership lessons thanks to the cone of shame:

  • As tough as it was for him to wear, it helped in the healing process.
  • In order to achieve a goal (look out the window), he had to make several adjustments and think outside the “cone.”
  • As a leader, you can’t always jump in to rescue someone. They have to learn things for themselves, as tough as it is to watch them fall.
  • Louie learned a few new things; like how to eat his food with the cone, even though he looked like a vacuum cleaner as he leaned over his bowl and inhaled.
  • He figured out pretty quickly that he was good at tipping the water bowl over.
  • There was no need for me to walk around calling the contraption on his head the cone of shame. Well, actually, that’s a lie—he hated it and no doubt, was ashamed to wear it!
  • The less opportunity he had to bother his stitches, the faster he healed and the longer the cone stayed off. For Louie, this meant that he felt better, and was back to taking walks and playing with his pals.

Louie soaked in the attention for as long as he could. As time passed and his stitches were removed, I realized the overarching lesson of this entire experience. While we must take time to heal from some of life’s tough lessons, deep down inside, we know we can adjust and adapt. And in that perseverance, we may actually learn to enjoy life more.

 

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Thank you, Eastside Rotary, for inviting us to speak to your fabulous members!

 

Every year, March 20, we celebrate Louie! While we’re not sure of his actual birthday, we decided the first day of spring was a perfect day to celebrate his new life! Louie is somewhere between 5-6 years of age. Celebrate with us and wish this little guy a happy birthday! Thank you!